Tuesday, February 15, 2011

Shoot to reset

Man, it's cool.  I'd never heard of it before, but this is a nifty trick that doubled my shooting speed without expanding my groups.  Range Report on this tomorrow, but basically it goes like this:

1. On the firing line, with your pistol pointed at the target, take up the slack on your trigger.  This is your reset point. 

2. Squeeze the trigger the rest of the way to fire the gun.  Do NOT let the trigger all the way out.  Instead, let your trigger fingermove back to the reset point.  The pistol is ready to fire again.

It's possible that some pistols with little slack won't benefit from this technique (i.e. there's very little distance between the reset point and the break), but the Glock I shot had rather a lot of slack.  I'd expect a 92 would benefit a lot as well.  1911, maybe not so much.

It seems that this technique of minimizing the movement of your trigger finger reduces the opportunity for that movement to move your aim point off.  If you're a particularly good marksman, this might not be very much use at all - you already have the muscle memory to keep this from happening.  But for a duffer like me, it was nothing short of astonishing.  My moderately fast groups ("shoot once a second") were no bigger than my slow groups ("take all the time you want").

Report and pictures tomorrow, but I have to get the boys fed.  But man, I'm doing this again.

UPDATE 16 February 2011 15:01: Updated post with pictures here.

10 comments:

ASM826 said...

I am so glad you moved.

Anonymous said...

Just a head's up, if you're learning trigger reset, and you're shooting a pistol with a VERY short reset (like say, a Walther P99 in .40) you CAN bump fire 2+ rds off and startle the instructor.

Seen it done...

The trigger reset on a P99 is about half that of a Glock.

Anonymous said...

The Sig SRT (Short Reset Trigger) works really well for this.

Boat Guy said...

Keeping your finger on the trigger while allowing it to reset will reduce the tendency to "slap" the trigger and thus will promote accuracy through a better (smoother) trigger press. It works quite well on 1911's - at least for me.

DirtCrashr said...

I found it works better on my Sig than my 1911 - just the way my long fingers articulate I guess.

Isegoria said...

If you want to shoot a pistol quickly (and accurately), I recommend finding an expert — a competitive IPSC or IDPA shooter — who can train you in the thumbs-forward grip from an isosceles stance.

The mechanics of the grip and stance put the muzzle right back on target after a slight bump from the recoil.

Anonymous said...

John Farnam teaches this techniques in all his cloasses (pistol and rifle). He calls it "catching the link." It works.

George said...

That's how we were taught at Gunsite, as well.

Boat Guy said...

Isosceles stance at Gunsite? Cooper must be spinnin...

trackerk said...

Have Mrs. Borepatch work the slide for you and you can practice this at home during dry fire. Just have her put one hand on your shoulder and work the slide with the other.