Tuesday, June 29, 2021

Regarding the Miami Beach building disaster

OldNFO has some pertinent info on rescue.  He's been trained in this sort of thing and offers background info.

DiveMedic also has an excellent post about this, from the perspective of a trained Search and Rescue paramedic.

Both are pessimistic on the chance of more survivors.

8 comments:

Aesop said...

In about 99.9999% of cases, people aren't "missing" three days after a building collapses on them.

They're simply paté.

That's also the point at which irreversible kidney failure from dehydration starts, which is when rescue transitions into recovery.

Old NFO said...

Thanks for the link, and no, I don't hold out much hope. Just prayers...

Glen Filthie said...

The first rule of any rescue is always to protect yourself first, because if you don't, you are liable to end up with two victims. Even the airlines tell mothers with infants - that if the cabin loses pressure, they are to put their own oxygen masks on first, and the baby second.

Sadly, we can expect much more of this kind of thing as mass corruption and incompetence continues to go unpunished.

Divemedic said...

Appreciate the link. Thanks.

Pachydermis2 said...

Another area where reality and TV/Movies are much at variance.

T

Richard said...

This is another example of why density is bad. If bad maintenance causes my house to pancake, I will be injured and, if unlucky, killed. But the casualties will be limited to me, the dog, and perhaps a random visitor as opposed to the large numbers killed in a high rise disaster. Why people choose to live in such conditions is a mystery to me.

Ruth said...

I have an acquaintance who handles SAR dogs. And she said much the same. That most of the missing were DOA when the building went down in the first place, and the only blessing is that for those it was likely so quick they had no time to even realize something was happening much less suffer. The remainder would be dead before they could remove enough of the building to get to them. The survivors were likely on the edges of the damaged portion.

I can't help but wonder: I know FL had less covid restrictions than some states, but how much did covid affect their ability to get things done to fix this? Were meetings put off, or held virtually (which is NOT the same)? And how many other buildings, in more restrictive states, ended up having to put off repairs or inspections due to covid restrictions and people just not wanting to work because they were scared of covid?

Aesop said...

This had nothing to do with COVID.

It had to do with building managers ignoring engineer reports stating the need for maintenance and upgrades for three years.

Nothing, IOW, that wouldn't best be served by public flogging just short of death for all culpable, followed by a fine hanging in the courthouse square, with live TV coverage.