Friday, May 22, 2020

The lamp of civilization flickers

But it does not go out.  As ASM826 has posted, the Past is a foreign country - they do things differently there.  But even from Blighty, where it seems that the post-whatever elite has made fair their triumph, comes this: the first real Commando raid, sponsored by Churchill himself.

Yeah, it suffered two thirds casualties, but it accomplished the mission.  I wonder what the current generation would make of this.

Actually, I don't.


9 comments:

ASM826 said...

Giants strode the earth in those days.

riverrider said...

judging by the cadets i see daily, there is little hope.

Beans said...

Some, well, many of the things the Sub Service and the various special forces, especially Delta and ANV have done in the last 40-50 years would boggle people's minds.

Of course, most all of us don't have the minimum security clearance, and even if we did, we all lack the need to know.

Some weird stuff, really weird stuff, happened during the Cold War and after.

Not every military member these days is a Bradley Manning.

Old NFO said...

It was a failure, but it DID set us down a new road...

Will said...

Old NFO:

pretty much everything W.Churchill put into motion was a failure. The only thing he salvaged was not losing ww2, but the British lost everything else. Hazard of starting wars. Reminds me of the saying "we need a short, victorious war".

Chris said...

Well, Churchill had one thing in common with George Washington: he persevered through each successive failure until he reached victory with the help of a stronger foreign power.

ASM826 said...

This wasn't a failure. The mission was a complete success. The drydock was out of commission until 1948. It just came at a high cost.

Goober said...

It sounds like you're suggesting that the British started the war.

Beans said...

Well, then there's the US raid where they purposely crashed a Jolly Green into a Viet Prison. The Son Tay raid.

Lots of 'greatest raids' out there.

As to British failures, they weren't Churchill's fault. They were often faults of the General Headquarters, or the field marshall in charge.

Churchill believed in giving orders and letting the 'experts' fill in the blanks. Much like, oh, say, Montgomery and his expert handling of Marketgarden. (sarcasm implied.)