Tuesday, June 16, 2020

Damnatio Memoriae

Damnatio memoriae. Literally "condemning the memory".

The phrased was not used in Roman times, it dates form the 1600s, but the idea was there. After a king or an emperor died, they could be erased from history. Their names chiseled off the memorials, all mention of their name forbidden, their tomb eliminated. It was not uncommon in Rome for the incoming emperor to do it to his predecessor.

Stalin did it to Trotsky and others

The Taliban did to the Buddha status in 2017.

Now we are going to do it. Once we get started it will be easy. The hard part will be stopping.

5 comments:

Glen Filthie said...

Aprapos of nothing at all, it says there that Stalin was fond of purges too...

Old NFO said...

It won't end... just sayin...

Toirdhealbheach Beucail said...

Borepatch, for what it is worth this has created two urges in me. The first is to hold on even more tightly to my older books, as they may no longer ever be available. The second is to start buying original works of the great Roman and Greek thinkers before they are banned or unavailable.

waepnedmann said...

The Egyptians and Mayans also practiced the removal of names and memorials of prior kings.
It must be some drive in humans since it appears to be a universal trait of human leaders.

Re. Books.
I am distrustful of Kindle/Amazon Fire and other such products, because they can be made to disappear by the supplier.
I read for entertainment on the electronic devices, but the "important" stuff I keep as hardcover.

Some printed books are incredibly cheap, particularly some of the classics.

LSP said...

Sick to the back teeth of these tin-pot Maoists. That's putting it very mildly.