Thursday, January 9, 2020

Right Wing Glaciers Not Following The Narrative

The Park Service is removing signs in Glacier National Park informing the public that the glaciers will be gone by 2020. Because who ya gonna believe? The Park Service or your lyin' eyes?

The Jackson Glacier, visible from the highway, has grown 25% in the last decade. 



UPDATE 9 January 2020 19:13 [Borepatch]:  The only thing I would add to ASM826's post is that it's all Obama's fault.  Not only did The Lightbringer stop the rise of the oceans, he stopped the melting of the glaciers.  That's quite a legacy.

2 comments:

ProudHillbilly said...

Dang. You beat me. This was my laugh of the day. Except for the part where we paid for those signs.

Unknown said...

I'd just like to point out that no-one in the world other than Roger Roots is claiming that the Jackson Glacier is growing.

The "Teams from Lysander Spooner University" consist of himself and perhaps some buddies, and "Lysander Spooner University" is his blog, rather than a university in the more conventional sense.

I'm not saying that he's wrong, but if one relies on his reports in conversation with academics, it is very easy for them to frame his interesting history and activities to make it look like you have gullibly fallen for a prank.

I'd hoped that perhaps Google Street View might have similar views of the glacier from the road to the sun over several dates to compare, but haven't found any.

One can compare ice-area using NASA Landsat image archives, using the technique described here: https://medium.com/radiant-earth-insights/ten-year-challenge-glacier-national-park-49dd5821b151.

NASA have done this themselves and posted a slide show here: https://earthobservatory.nasa.gov/world-of-change/Glacier where one can download JPG of individual frames to compare at max zoom, and in a video here: https://svs.gsfc.nasa.gov/30788 where one can compare the Jackson Glacier in 2009 at 13 seconds with the Jackson Glacier in 2015 at 15 seconds.

I leave it to the reader to ponder whether the difference in ice-area around the Jackson Glacier shown in the images is an increase or decrease, and whether it is an artifact of one image being at a time of day when more of the land surface is in shadow.