Wednesday, August 14, 2019

It Will Be On The Quiz

Alaska became a U.S. Territory in 1912. Commit that to memory, it will be on the quiz.

Update: The Territory of Alaska or Alaska Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States from August 24, 1912, until Alaska was granted statehood on January 3, 1959. The territory was previously the Department of Alaska, 1868–1884; and the District of Alaska, 1884–1912.

7 comments:

Borepatch said...

Ha! We need to play trivia again.

libertyman said...

Okay class, how many states were added to the US in the 20th century?

Richard said...

@libertyman

5. Everyone forgets OK.
Let the 21st Century be the one where we subtract states. Start wit CA and NY.

ASM826 said...

Richard,

Without looking my guess was 4. You're right, I forgot Oklahoma.

Aesop said...

Point of order:

Last I looked, Alaska was purchased from Russia in 1867.
("Seward's Folly".)
It was a territory then, and ever since.

All they did in 1912 was administratively organize it into one coherent territory.

Carry on.

ASM826 said...

Not my words: The Territory of Alaska or Alaska Territory was an organized incorporated territory of the United States from August 24, 1912, until Alaska was granted statehood on January 3, 1959. The territory was previously the Department of Alaska, 1868–1884; and the District of Alaska, 1884–1912.

Aesop said...

Like I said, that's just pedantic and semantic.
Po-tay-toe/poh-tah-toe.
It was U.S territory the day we bought it.
We just didn't name it one, "organized and incorporated", until 1912, and we hadn't even finally resolved claims with Canada over its southeast border with Great Britain, and then Canada, until 1903. Largely because nobody bothered to formally survey the land in question before we bought it.

We used to have military Departments of all sorts scattered across the western US prior to their formal civil organization too (Department of Missouri, Department of Kansas, Department of Arizona, etc.). They too were nonetheless US territory long before achieving that official status in civil law.

Heck it took three tries for Georgia to get it together and finally belong to the United States.

Historically, only territories deemed "organized and incorporated" are on a track to statehood, which was largely why the 1912 administrative reorganization of AK was undertaken.

Which, for example, is why Samoa, Guam, the Virgin Islands, and Puerto Rico probably never will (nor should) become states, while Alaska and Hawaii were pretty much headed there from the outset.

Everything the U.S. owns or lays claim to is U.S. territory (with a small "t"). The large "T" just makes it civilly administered and far more official than some rock in the south Pacific where there are no natives, therefore no formal local government, and the local economy consists of mining bird poop for chemical processes.

We even have 172 other U.S. territories in as many other nations, which won't be organized or incorporated ever, let alone admitted to the U.S. as states. We call them embassies and consulates.

We inherited Puerto Rico after beating Spain in 1898, for instance.
For $2 cash, we should cut them loose permanently (minus Vieques) on any July 4th pending, and wish them well in their future endeavors. Any territory that can't handle republican representative democracy after living under it for 120+ years, lacks the common sense gene, and probably never will manage it.
And Alaska should be weaned off the federal government teat as well. The entire state has been living on welfare in perpetuity. It might have made sense in 1959, but that was three generations ago. If you can't make a living without a perpetual handout from Uncle Sugar's wallet, it's time to cut bait and move back to the Lower 48.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Territories_of_the_United_States#Alaska_Territory