Friday, March 10, 2017

I Have Seen The Future

Let's start with the basics. It never takes a sick day. It doesn't want a raise. It doesn't fail to wash after leaving the restroom.

Once a computer kiosk is used to place the order, how close are we to a fry station robot, a condiments robot and a bagging robot? Raise the minimum wage and reach the cost/benefit crossover point for the major chain fast food restaurants that much sooner.

 I can tell you that in the 1990s we were using servo driven, fully computer controlled, bagging equipment for product in a factory. It took the finished products off a conveyor, stacked, compressed, bagged, and boxed the bags for shipping, sending the finished product boxes up a conveyor to a fully automated pallet stacker. The stacked pallets were picked up by a human on a forklift, that driver being the only person involved in doing anything but monitoring the process and feeding raw materials to the upstream end.


8 comments:

Old NFO said...

And the wailing and gnashing of teeth will be EPIC... And somebody, probably the ACLU will sue to have the former burger flippers paid to 'watch' Flippy work...

Cecil Henry said...

And what does the parasitic mindset immediately think???

Tax them. TAx tax tax these robots like humans.

Disgusting.

Tim Covington said...

Fry station robot is easy. They already have them in factories. You just need to reduce the size. That's a fairly simple engineering problem.

Skeptic said...

The ultimate dream of all working people, business owners and industrialists. Only problem is there nobody left working earning a wage to buy all the robot produced goods (except the robot repair team). Oh, wait; the robots will repair themselves then toss the humans in the recycle heap.

JD said...

After dealing with McDonlads the other night where just about everyone there has English as a next language I would welcome this. At least I would get what I ordered without having to go back two or three times to fix things. . . Honestly last time I go to that particular Macs. . . the one the next town over speaks English. . .

Comrade Misfit said...

Back in the day, I worked as a bundler in a corrugated box plant.

The flat sheets came from a press which cut the slits and tabs, scored the bendy parts and printed the customer's artwork on the outside. The sheets went to a folder-gluer/taper/stapler, where an operator fed them in. The now-fastend folded box came out the other and and went to the bundler (me).

I would gather 20-25 or so of the flat boxes into a stack, tie a string around them and then stack the bundles on a pallet.

A machine was developed to bundle and fasten the output. Another was developed to replace the operator. The fastening and printing functions were combined.

Those were decent jobs that paid enough to live on. And now they're gone.

Reg T said...

Think of all the nightmares no longer to be suffered, when you can fire your HR department, the corporate lawyers who handled the EEO complaints, false sexual harassment claims, faked discrimination claims (race, gender, sexual orientation), and ditch the Prozac.etc.

Toirdhealbheach Beucail said...

Perhaps the more disturbing thing is that this sort of thing can be predicted and yet people do not look far enough down the line to realize that it can happen and take action now to help alleviate it. In a way, sadly like the dinosaurs: we would rather continue to dwell in our dwindling swamp rather than strike out for other swamps that may exist somewhere else.

Two thoughts, I guess: One would be look to the future and see what those jobs will be and prepare for them. Two would be to live in a frugal manner and/or learn to do what you can for yourself, to lessen your dependence on such a system.