Tuesday, December 9, 2014

Remington 700 Triggers

The Remington 700 has been in the news the last few days. If you haven't already heard about it, Remington is recalling Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with X-Mark Pro triggers manufactured from May 1, 2006 to April 9, 2014.

The issue is that in a small number of cases rifles have fired when the rifle was moved from "safe" to "fire" and perhaps could fire when the rifle was not being handled at all. Here's USAToday's recent article on the topic.

If you let the muzzle of a loaded rifle cover anything you don't want to destroy, blaming the manufacturer is a copout. People have died and if the triggers need to be replaced, by all means let's get them replaced, but personal responsibility does not go away. If you're "cleaning" a loaded rifle and the muzzle is pointed in an unsafe direction, you're responsible for what happens.

If you drop the safety on a loaded rifle while it's pointed at another person and the rifle discharges when you didn't plan on it, you still had the weapon pointed at another person. You loaded it and you pointed it.

Now, if you have the rifle pointed out at the ground, into a berm, or into a bucket of sand in the corner of your shop, and the hammer falls when you drop the safety, I'm all for saying there's a problem with the rifle and it needs to be serviced. If you have a Remington that falls under this recall, I have done my part to share the word.

If you handle firearms of any sort, from a .22 revolver to a .50BMG sniper rifle, remember that you are personally responsible for every round you fire. When you pick up a firearm, you are responsible for where the muzzle is pointed. If it's not pointed in a safe direction, the courts may accept the argument that the gun just went off and you're not responsible. You will have to live with the truth.
Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with X-Mark Pro (“XMP”) triggers manufactured from May 1, 2006 to April 9, 2014 - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/04/11/huge-recall-remington-700-model/#sthash.1IoQfRtf.dpuf
Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with X-Mark Pro (“XMP”) triggers manufactured from May 1, 2006 to April 9, 2014 - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/04/11/huge-recall-remington-700-model/#sthash.1IoQfRtf.dpuf
Model 700 and Model Seven rifles with X-Mark Pro (“XMP”) triggers manufactured from May 1, 2006 to April 9, 2014 - See more at: http://www.thefirearmblog.com/blog/2014/04/11/huge-recall-remington-700-model/#sthash.1IoQfRtf.dpuf

2 comments:

Walter Zoomie said...

I had a 700 I got gently used from a relative. First time out, it discharged when I took it off safe. Scared the hell outta me, but no harm done seeing as I know how to handle a boom stick.

Took it to a gunsmith. He found the trigger had been "lightened." He said there are two set screws on the trigger mechanism, and on one of them the thread-locker was broken from somebody dicking with it. I had him reset it to factory trigger pull and lock it down, and all is now right with the world.

I got rid of it anyways when I turned in all my guns to the nice government man, so it's all pointless now anyways...

selsey.steve said...

I started handling rifles as a very young person, I think I was about 10 years old when I started shooting a .22. When I was 14 years of age my father gave me a somewhat battered but very accurate .375, saying "You're not taking a .22 into the bush, you'll just annoy anything you shoot. Be careful with this one." The rifle came with 50 rather expensive (in those days) rounds. As you might have guessed, I grew up in Africa (Northern Rhodesia, now Zambia).
When my fiends and I went out shooting JAFIs (Just Another F**king Impala)no-one's rifle had one up the spout until we actually had a target in sight. It was only when the hunt was on that rifle bolts were re-inserted into the weapons!
The chosen shooter loaded, the back-up shooter was loaded with the safety on, the rest of us had loaded mags and empty chambers.
There was no chance of any 'accidental' discharge causing injury because no loaded rifle was ever pointed in the wrong direction.
We were all young teenagers but no-one had to teach us gun safety. We just did it, it was common sense. Well, it was to us, back then.
We went hunting for the pot just about every week-end for a number of years. There was never an 'accidental' discharge of any fire-arm during that time.