Monday, December 1, 2014

3 Gun Follow-up

I took the 1911 to my smith yesterday afternoon. He disassembled it, walked me through everything, and in the end replaced the mainspring. (Part # 25 on the diagram) We won't know for sure until next weekend when I can get to the range, but he was pretty certain that was the problem.



At Brownell's, I found a .223 loaded ammo case gage. It's ordered, and I am going to run all my reloads through it. Just looking at some examples, I can see that I am likely slightly bulging a few of the cases. I probably have the seating die turned in slightly too far. I know from other issues that sometimes half a thousandth of an inch is enough to fix or cause a problem.

Here's a picture of the problem. The ones on the left are clear and obvious. I would have seen that right away. Some of mine look like the one on the right. It's slight, and most of the lot are okay, then every once in a while, one has this subtle bulge. I'm just going to gage the whole lot and then pull down any that don't pass.


10 comments:

B said...

Yer talking bout the three fingered spring in the action?

Wow. I have tens of thousands of rounds through several 1911's and never have had to replace one.

Recoils springs, on the other hand......

Nosmo King said...

Pro tip: when checking cases coming off the press with the case gauge, do it continuous flow and not in batch mode.

ASM826 said...

B,

No, I'm talking about the main spring, sometimes called the hammer spring. It's inside the main spring housing. I updated the post to include a 1911 diagram.

Mark

B said...

Ah. Still, never had to replace one of those, either. Light strikes on primers, then?

ASM826 said...

B,

Yes, exactly that, light strikes. Of course, this happened during the match. Never happened before. The gun is one I got after a Shot Show, and while I had never taken that spring out, the one that was in there had clearly been cut. That and the number of rounds put through it finally added up to a problem.

abnormalist said...

On your brass, could that be a case of over length brass? IE triming time?

ASM826 said...

abnormalist,

Yes, that is a possibility. It's also true that this is mixed brass bulk reloading, so there could be a pattern to which brass is the problem. I'll know once I get the loaded ammo gage.

Backing off the seating die will help as long as the cases still firmly hold the bullet. I do check overall length with a Wilson case gage and sort them to be trimmed.

Still, if I've on the edge of too long on some cases coupled with a little too deep on the seating die, I've created my own intermittent problem.

B said...

Question: What was the temp during the shoot? If it was cold the problem might be a lube issue. But you said the spring had been cut, so.....

abnormalist said...

Could also look at a post sizer die. IE lee factory crimp die. Its a favorite of mine for the "cheap reloads" where I may not spend enough (read any) time on brass prep

Paul Bonneau said...

When setting up the seating die, is there any crimp ring in there? The usual thing (as you probably know) is to put a case in and turn the die down until the crimp ring contacts the case, then back it out a bit and lock. But there are potential failures in this process. For example, what if the case you used was shorter than most? What if you didn't back out enough? What if the die turned after several reloads? (I've had a bear of a time with some dies, getting them to stay locked against the locking ring).

I've seen similar cases in .308 using the Lee collet sizer, but that was caused by something else I think.