Thursday, October 2, 2014

Walker Colt

OldNFO had two words to say, "Walker Colt." Back in 2008, a Walker Colt came up at auction. It sold for $800,000.


They don't all cost that much, but $150,000 seems to be a reasonable starting point. They have a storied history and most of them saw a lot of use.That link has detailed pictures of the gun from various angles and you can see how much wear it shows.

A nice reproduction can be had for about $400 and if shooting it was part of what you want it for, that would be the way to go. The originals are 160 years old and weren't made to an impressive level of metallurgy when they were new.

Of course, a $400 reproduction isn't a grail gun.

8 comments:

Keads said...

I think I might SEE one this weekend at the Annual Colt Collectors Convention. I hope they don't charge for breathing the air around it =)

NotClauswitz said...

"A $400 reproduction isn't a grail gun." Indeed, but like a Ruger GP100 you can shoot the hell out of it and have a blast without your Investment Management partners interfering.

And Caleb has one he calls "Locomotive Breath" - highly evocative. Ride well and safe.

Dave H said...

Locomotive Breath. HAW! Thanks for putting that song in my head. But yes, that's an excellent name for a black powder pistol.

Tam said...

Those things are to Texans what Kamakura-period swords are to the Japanese: National Treasures.

Old NFO said...

They are treasures... The Gonzales Walker went for $960,000 I have actually SEEN one of them. Didn't get to touch it though... sigh...

Goober said...

The funny thing is, the Walker was a pistol plagued by problems. Even in it's day, it had poor metallurgy and had a tendency to fail in various ways, from what I've learned.

I think the biggest draw to them was that they were BIG. They used a bigger powder charge, and had a bigger frame, and they were just big...

No wonder Texans liked them so much. :)

For my money, if I'm looking for a blackpowder pistol, the 1858 is higher on my list than the Walker. It's the last of the blackpowder guns that actually had a backstrap on it, for increased durability and rigidity.

Goober said...

In fact, as I recall, one of the reasons the Walker is so rare is that less than 1,500 of them were made, because they were such a shitty pistol, they were only in production for like a year before Colt redesigned the entire setup into the first Dragoon (which was then improved two more times int he second and third dragoons).

I'm not really knocking the choice of grail gun, because they are very rare, and very valuable, but when it comes down to it, as far as pistols of it's day go, it kinda sucked.

Although it was the only pistol of it's day that had a confirmed kill at 100 yards. (one of the biggest design flaws being that although it was really only strong enough to handle 60 or so grains of black powder, it could easily be loaded with as much as 80 grains, which lead to rifle-like velocities and power (my Hawken 50, for instance, loads with 90 grains behind a bigger, heavier bullet).

NotClauswitz said...

Reading Handloader (magazine) my understanding is that with the proper charge they are in .44Magnum territory. Not too shabby.
I like to shoot my M1909 Colt semi-Grail gun with the mis-matched latch using standard .45 Colt loads.