Monday, September 29, 2014

Navy M14

Burt's grail gun is the one he remembers. An M-14, as issued by the U.S. Navy, along with the accessories, sling, pouches, magazines, and the like.

It's the rifle that replaced the Garand. Chambered in .308, select fire, accuracy with a punch. It was swept aside in favor of the M-16, but it will not go away. Units still carry and use the M-14 and in the recent unpleasantness in the Middle East, the value of a .30 caliber rifle in the hands of a dedicated marksman has proven itself. 


They were good days, those days of our youth, maybe better than we realized at the time. To own the rifle we carried then would be to own a piece of our own history.



10 comments:

Murphy's Law said...

Few finer rifles have ever existed...or will

Comrade Misfit said...

Shot those things a lot. I'd like to have a M-14, but they're pricey. So I'll just go with my Garand.

Old NFO said...

Sadly there are few in private hands...

Goober said...

The non=select fire civvie versions of the m14 are great rifles, too, for almost any purpose that you could imagine on the north american continent.

A bit light for moose, but still very capable of bringing one down.

Fun as hell to shoot rock chucks and coyotes with.

Maybe not so good for bird hunting, i guess, but no one is perfect...

Dave H said...
This comment has been removed by the author.
burt said...

(sigh)

drjim said...

What's the vapor towards the front?

Does the gas system vent unused pressure or something?

Rev. Paul said...

The first rifle I ever shot in a caliber larger than .22LR was a Navy M-14. Got my attention in a hurry!

Goober said...

Drjim - they pretty much all do.

The "cylinder" on most gas operated rifles and shotguns is a lot shorter than most people think it would be. On my Remington 1100, it's maybe 1" long? Maybe? Have to measure it. It's that short because that's all it needs. Explosive gasses have a way of being pretty energetic, so to keep your bolt from slamming explosively back into the breech, they vent the gasses after the piston has only traveled some fraction of it's total travel distance.

Anyway, the piston essentially travels out the end of the cylinder, and the expanding gasses vent to atmosphere. If you can picture it, the cylinder usually has a slit in it, and when the piston moves past the slit, the gases vent.

Most all piston-actuated automatics vent at the front of the fore-grip. Some direct the gasses up, some out to the sides, and some straight down.

It appears the M14 is of the "straight down" variety.

Lots of guys that shoot ARs solely don't quite get this because ARs generally don't have pistons and gas vents up front. They are direct impingement and vent the mechanism gasses out the aciton and down the barrel.

drjim said...

Thanks, Goober!

Guess I never understood in detail the differences between the various gas systems.